Saturday, May 4, 2013

Tiny Octopus-Like Microorganisms Named After Lovecraft's Cthulhu

found via: http://www.sciencespacerobots.com


Newly discovered tiny octopus-like microorganisms have been named after the fictional monsters created by American horror author H.P. Lovecraft. The single-cell protists, Cthulhu macrofasciculumque and Cthylla microfasciculumque, live in the gut of termites and help them digest wood. The scientists say in a release that they decided to name the creatures after the Lovecraft monsters as "as an ode to the sometimes strange and fascinating world of the microbe." 

UBC researcher Erick James, lead author of the paper describing the new protists, says, "When we first saw them under the microscope they had this unique motion, it looked almost like an octopus swimming." 
The octopus-like movements and appearance of both protists reminded James of the horrid Cthulhu and Cthylla. Lovecraft described the Cthulhu as "A monster of vaguely anthropoid outline, but with an octopus-like head whose face was a mass of feelers, a scaly, rubbery-looking body, prodigious claws on hind and fore feet, and long, narrow wings behind, along with a large jugular vein." 
Cthulhu and Cthylla are very small. They are in the range of 10 to 20 microns, which is why they had not previously been identified. Most of the larger protists living in termites - that have already been identified - are around 50 to 150 microns. 
Here is a video of the Cthulhu macrofasciculumque in action: 
Photo: University of British Columbia

Photo: University of British Columbia




The research paper was published here in PLoS One
Photo: University of British Columbia

On collecting Lovecraftiana

found via: http://lordbassingtonbassington.blogspot.de




"Is this the final exorcism/Of an obsession"

As someone who, well, loves H.P. Lovecraft, and has a tendency to gather small topical book collections, Lord Bassington-Bassington has acquired a decent assortment of books related to The Gentleman of Providence through the years. So it shouldn't be surprising that there is a separate bookshelf here at Bassington Manor dedicated to Lovecraftiana: Writings by Lovecraft, about Lovecraft, inspired by Lovecraft and writings that inspired Lovecraft.
One could perhaps lay down the claim that this is the largest collection of Lovecraftian titles in Norway, and invite challengers to a geek-off. But the question is whether this shelf is something to be ashamed rather than proud of. There are plenty of times that Lord Bassington-Bassington has felt that his Lovecraft obsession was a bit of an embarassment.
One could, you know, become a minor expert on some author that normal adults have actually heard of.
So perhaps this post is as much an attempt to gather Lord Bassington-Bassington's thoughts about collecting Lovecraftiana. Some thinking about this is a real necessity these days, when the market is flooded by books cashing in of the fact that the copyright to The Gentleman of Providence expired a few years ago. The growing interest in Lovecraft in popular culture (especially films) also contributes to this. Perhaps a few words about His Lordship's collection of Lovecraftian DVDslater.

The trick, as in so many other things, is to know when to stop. Much of what is released is, frankly, so Dogawful that it's a waste of money and shelf space to buy and store it, and a soul-killing effort to actually read it. The trick is to search out the gems. This will be even more important as the Lovecraftian juggernaut rolls on.
So perhaps this post is as much an attempt to gather Lord Bassington-Bassington's thoughts about collecting Lovecraftiana. Some thinking about this is a real necessity these days, when the market is flooded by books cashing in of the fact that the copyright to The Gentleman of Providence expired a few years ago. The growing interest in Lovecraft in popular culture (especially films) also contributes to this. Perhaps a few words about His Lordship's collection of Lovecraftian DVDslater.
The trick, as in so many other things, is to know when to stop. Much of what is released is, frankly, so Dogawful that it's a waste of money and shelf space to buy and store it, and a soul-killing effort to actually read it. The trick is to search out the gems. This will be even more important as the Lovecraftian juggernaut rolls on.

The trick, as in so many other things, is to know when to stop. Much of what is released is, frankly, so Dogawful that it's a waste of money and shelf space to buy and store it, and a soul-killing effort to actually read it. The trick is to search out the gems. This will be even more important as the Lovecraftian juggernaut rolls on.




Then after all, His Lordship didn't choose to become obessed with Lovecraft - Lovecraft chose him. 


So there, dear reader, you have it. Lord Bassington-Bassington's shelf of shame. Or pride. Or whatever. Now let's see if something similar can be done with Lord Bassington-Bassington's collection of style books...


Cthulhu Fhtagn! Miller Edition.

found via: http://propnomicon.blogspot.de


Britta Miller returns to our pages with this green stone Cthulhu idol.

As an aside, her idol is just the latest of the spring Cthulhus. I first noticed a burst of new idols appearing during the spring of 2012 and the pattern is repeating this year. Do artists suddenly get inspired? Or is it just a matter of having free time thanks to spring break? Whatever the cause, it's a pretty interesting occurrence.

Cthulhu Fhtagn! Tatarelli Edition.

found via http://propnomicon.blogspot.de


John Tatarelli Jr. takes the concept of layered texture about as far as it can go in this Cthulhu sculpt. Keep in mind this figure is only about 7" high.

An Eldritch Easter

found via: http://propnomicon.blogspot.de


Jason McKittrick brings us this nicely done Cthulhu cultist plaque. It's a limited edition piece that's only available for 72 hours.

Alhazred's Tablet

found via: http://propnomicon.blogspot.de


I won't encourage you to check out Alhazred's Tablet from Jason McKittrick, since it's a product of his pact with the dark powers. No one, at least no human, can sculpt and cast so many nifty artifacts as he has over the last few months.* 

Lovecraftian Matchbooks

found via: http://propnomicon.blogspot.de


Mike Jenkins was generous enough to send over a collection of Lovecraftian matchbooks. The PDFs can transform a normal book of matches into a handy clue or atmospheric prop.

Inspired by the HPLHS, I have endeavored to create some 1920's-1930's-suitable matchbooks.
The Morrison Co. ones are a reference to the short story "The Call of Cthulhu", and the First National ones are a reference to "The Shadow Over Innsmouth."
First National is / was a real grocery store chain, and this logo is a recreation of their actual logo. I don't know why the HPLHS used a different logo when they made their paper prop (the hand-drawn map included in their SOI radio drama CD).
Fer de Mal is a phony cigarette brand I made up.
Print on white or off-white cardstock. Score on the dashed lines, cut on the solid lines.
If you have any problems downloading the PDFs just leave a note. Google Drive can be a bit wiggy about permissions.